Neighborhood Communities

WAIKIKI BEACH

WAIKIKI BEACH

Waikīkī  (/wkˈk/; Hawaiian: [vɐjˈtiːˈtiː, wɐjˈtiːˈtiː]) is a beachfront neighborhood of Honolulu, on the south shore of the island of Oʻahu, in Hawaii, United States. Waikiki is best known for Waikīkī Beach, the white sand beach shoreline fronting the neighborhood.

Waikīkī is home to public places including Kapiʻolani Park, Fort DeRussy, Kahanamoku Lagoon, Kūhiō Beach Park, and Ala Wai Harbor.

The area was a retreat for Hawaiian royalty in the 1800s who enjoyed surfing there on early forms of longboards.[2]  

A few small hotels opened in the 1880s. In 1893, Greek-American George Lycurgus leased the guest house of Allen Herbert and renamed it the “Sans Souci” (French for “without worries”) creating one of the first beach resorts. Later that year Robert Louis Stevenson stayed at the resort; subsequently it became a popular destination for tourists from the mainland.[3] The area at coordinates 21°15′49″N 157°49′17″W is still called “Sans Souci Beach”.[4]

Today, the area is filled with large resort hotels, such as the Hilton Hawaiian Village, the Halekulani hotel, the Hyatt Regency Waikīkī and Hyatt Place Waikiki, the Sheraton Waikīkī, and historic hotels dating back to the early 20th century (such as the Moana Surfrider Hotel and the Royal Hawaiian Hotel). The beach hosts many events a year, including surf competitions, outdoor performances, hula dancing and outrigger canoe races.

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waikiki)

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KAIMUKI

KAIMUKI

Kaimukī is a residential neighborhood in Honolulu, Hawaii, United States.

In the 19th century the area was a farm of King Kalākaua, where ostriches roamed wild over the mountain side. It later became the site of a carnation farm for funeral flowers. Now a mix of residential area with a small business district (mainly restaurants and service industries), it is located in the urbanized Honolulu region near Kahala and Diamond Head.

Kaimukī is an ancient Hawaiian name. Its name comes from Ka imu kī meaning “The ti root oven” in theHawaiian language.[1] The area was known for the many ovens used to bake kī Cordyline fruticosa, or ti roots, into a sweet food similar to candy.

Kaimukī’s main street is Waialae Avenue, pronounced Wai-ah-lai.[needs IPA] Several restaurants and stores are located on this street, as well as Kaimukī District Park.

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaimuki,_Hawaii)

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DIAMOND HEAD

DIAMOND HEAD

Diamond Head is the name of a volcanic tuff cone on the Hawaiian island of Oʻahu and known to Hawaiians as ʻahi, most likely from lae ‘browridge, promontory’ plus ʻahi ‘tuna’ because the shape of the ridgeline resembles the shape of a tuna‘s dorsal fin.[3] Its English name was given by British sailors in the 19th century, who mistook calcite crystals on the adjacent beach fordiamonds.[4]

Diamond Head is a defining feature of the view known to residents and tourists of Waikīkī, and also a U.S. National Natural Monument. The volcanic tuff cone is a United States State Monument. While part of it is closed to the public and serves as a platform for antennas used by the U.S. government, the crater’s proximity to Honolulu’s resort hotels and beaches makes the rest of it a popular destination.

A 0.75-mile (1.1-km) hike leads to the edge of the crater’s rim. Signs at the trailhead say that the hike takes 1.5–2 hours round-trip, and recommends that hikers bring water. Although not difficult, the signs also say that the hike is not a casual one: the mostly unpaved trail winds over uneven rock, ascends 74 steps, then through a tunnel and up another steep 99 steps. Next is a small lighted tunnel to a narrow spiral staircase (43 steps) inside a coastal artillery observation platform built in 1908. From the summit above the observation platform both Waikīkī and the Pacific Ocean can be seen in detail. It is a short but steep hike – it is a 560 ft. elevation gain for a total elevation of 762 ft.[2] There is a water fountain near the bathrooms at the foot of the trail in case you want to hydrate before the hike or fill an empty bottle. The park closes at 6pm and signs posted indicate that you are not allowed to head up the trail after 4:30pm.[2]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_Head,_Hawaii)

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HAWAII KAI

HAWAII KAI

Hawaiʻi Kai is a largely residential area located in the City & County of Honolulu, in the East Honolulu CDP on the island of Oʻahu. Hawaiʻi Kai is the largest of several communities at the eastern end of the island. The area was largely developed by Henry J. Kaiseraround the ancient Maunalua fishpond and wetlands area known as Kuapā (meaning “fishpond wall”). The Hawaiʻi Kai or Koko Marina was dredged from Kuapā Pond starting around 1959. Dredging not only transformed the shallow coastal inlet and wetlands into a marine embayment, but was accompanied by considerable filling and clearing of the pond margins. In 1961, Kaiser-Aetnaentered into a lease agreement with the land owner, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate, to develop the 521 acre (2.11 km²) fishpond into residential tracts with a marina and channels separated by fingers of land and islands upon which house lots and commercial properties would be laid out and developed (ACOE, 1975). Nearly all of the low-lying lands surrounding the marina have since been developed, and neighborhoods now extend back into the several valleys and up the separating ridges.

Kalama Valley is a community within the town of Hawaiʻi Kai located on the eastern coast of the island of Oʻahu. It features a shopping center, a public park and basketball facilities, and predominately single-family, relatively high-priced housing, due to its location in Hawaiʻi Kai. Previously, the shopping center held a convenience store, auto care center, Chinese restaurant, Thai restaurant, and church. As of 2008, the Thai restaurant and auto care center are all that remain. There have been rumors in the past of other businesses possibly opening up in the rather new and empty looking center, but there has yet to be any additions to the shopping center, except for a recycling point in its parking lot.

There are a variety of attractions in the vicinity of Kalama Valley, including Hawaii Kai Golf Course, Sandy Beach, Makapuʻu Lighthouse and beach, Koko Crater Botanical Garden, the “From Here to Eternity” cove, and Hanauma Bay. Sandy Beach, is a picturesque and sandy beach park barely a mile away from Kalama Valley. Sandy Beach is a popular beach for the local crowd, and, due to its quiet location and powerful waves, is a hot spot for body surfing and rarely overcrowded with tourists. Koko Crater botanical garden encloses beautiful plumeria trees and plants from different regions of the world. There is an easy hike up to Makapuʻu lighthouse, which overlooks the beautiful Makapuʻu Beach, Sea Life Park and the windward coast. In the winter it serves as a whale watching look out. As a marine-life sanctuary, Hanauma Bay is idyllic for snorkeling.

“Kamehame Ridge” is a ridge located in the middle of Kalama and Kamilo Iki Valley. Kamehame Ridge was developed during the 1990s.[1] Now there are multi-million dollars homes and real estate stretching from the bottom to the top of the Ridge. Most famous for its popular hike, known locally as “Dead Man’s Catwalk,”. This hike is a paved road that ascends quickly and easily to the top of the Ko’olau Mountains. Despite its death-defying nickname, this hike is rather a mellow stroll, providing walkers and hikers stunning views of Oahu’s windward coast. The air is often filled with hang gliders, enthusiastically performing for the eager onlookers. But the main attraction for most is a concrete slab protruding out from the ridgeline – the “Dead Man’s Catwalk.” This icon makes for a beautiful photo, but please use caution as you walk onto the protruding slab. In total, the hike takes about 45 minutes to an hour, walking shoes, water, and sunscreen is a must. Warning, there is a security guard who patrols the area daily. There have been cases where trespassers are giving warnings or citations; enter at your own risk.[2]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_Kai,_Hawaii)

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WAIMANALO

WAIMANALO

Waimānalo is a census-designated place (CDP) in the City & County of Honolulu, in the District of Koʻolaupoko on the island of Oʻahu, Hawaii, United States. This small windward community is located near the eastern end of the island. In the Hawaiian language Waimānalo means “potable water“; it is so named for the many brackish ponds in the area that were used for irrigation. As of the 2010 Census, the CDP had a population of 5,451.[1]

Waimānalo is close to, but somewhat separated from, the neighborhood of Waimānalo Beach. Waimānalo has a small commercial center along Kalanianaʻole Highway, but is separated from the shoreline and Waimānalo Beach (the longest stretch of sandy shoreline on Oʻahu) by Bellows Air Force Station. Waimānalo is noteworthy for its local flavor and large agricultural lots in the valley that extend back towards the Koʻolau from the center of town. Numerous plant nurseries are found in this area. There are no hotels in Waimānalo.

Waimānalo is the site of Sea Life Park, located near Hawaiʻi Kai on Kalanianaole Highway. The U.S. postal code for Waimānalo is 96795.

Waimanalo is the home of Sea Life Park, a marine biology and sea-life attraction located near Makapu’u Beach.[4][5] Japanese sumo grand champion, Chad Rowan (aka Akebono) was born in Waimanalo.[6] A large statue of Akebono stands at the Waimanalo Shopping Center and serves as a tourist photo opportunity.[7]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waim%C4%81nalo,_Hawaii)

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KAILUA

KAILUA

Kailua /kˈlə/ is a census-designated place (CDP) in Honolulu County, Hawaii, United States. It lies in the Koʻolaupoko Districtof the island of Oʻahu on the windward coast at Kailua Bay. It is in the judicial district and the ahupua’a named Ko’olaupoko. It is 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Honolulu – over Nu‘uanu Pali. The population was 38,635 at the 2010 census.[1]

In the Hawaiian language Kailua means “two seas” or “two currents”, a contraction of the words kai (meaning “sea” or “sea water”) and ʻelua (meaning “two”); it is so named because of the two lagoons in the district or the two currents which run through Kailua Bay.

Kailua is primarily a residential community, with a centralized commercial district along Kailua Road. The population was 50,000 in 1992.[2]

Places of note in Kailua include Kailua Beach Park, Lanikai Beach, Kawai Nui Marsh, Maunawili Falls,[3] and Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

Kailua Beach is crescent-shaped, about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) long, and ranging between 50 and 150 feet (15 and 46 m) wide. The ocean bottom fronting the beach slopes gently to overhead depths without any coral heads. Light to medium waves support surfing and bodysurfing. The steady trade winds make Kailua Beach a top windsurfing and kitesurfing destination. Robby Naish, first World Champion of windsurfing and Professional Windsurfers Association Hall of Fame inductee, grew up in Kailua.[5][6][7]

Sea kayaking and stand-up paddleboarding to the protected seabird sanctuaries Flat Island and the Mokulua Islands, popularly known as “the Mokes”, have become increasingly popular water activities at the beach.

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kailua,_Honolulu_County,_Hawaii)

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HONOLULU

HONOLULU

Honolulu (/ˌhɒnəˈll/ or /ˌhnəˈll/;[5][6] Hawaiian pronunciation: [honoˈlulu]) is the state capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Hawaii.[a] It is the county seat of the City and County of Honolulu. Hawaii is a major tourist destination and Honolulu, situated on the island of Oahu, is the main gateway to Hawaii and a major gateway into the United States. The city is also a major hub for international business, military defense, as well as famously being host to a diverse variety of east-west and Pacific culture, cuisine, and traditions.

Honolulu is both the westernmost and the southernmost major American city. For statistical purposes, the U.S. Census Bureaurecognizes the approximate area commonly referred to as “City of Honolulu” (not to be confused with the “City and County”) as a census county division (CCD).[8] Honolulu is a major financial center of the islands and of the Pacific Ocean. The population ofHonolulu CCD was 390,738 at the 2010 census,[9] while the population of the consolidated city and county was 953,207.

Honolulu means “sheltered harbor”[10] or “calm port.”[11] The old name is said to be Kou, a district roughly encompassing the area from Nuuanu Avenue to Alakea Street and from Hotel Street to Queen Street which is the heart of the present downtown district.[12] The city has been the capital of the Hawaiian Islands since 1845 and gained historical recognition following the attack on Pearl Harbor by Japan near the city on December 7, 1941.

As of 2015, Honolulu was ranked high on world livability rankings, and was also ranked as the 2nd safest city in the United States.[13][14] It is also the most populated Oceanian city outside Australasia and ranks second only to Auckland as the most populous city in Polynesia.[15][16]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honolulu)

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WAIPAHU

WAIPAHU

Waipahu is a former sugarcane plantation town and now census-designated place (CDP) located in the ʻEwa District on the island of Oʻahu in the City & County of Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the CDP population was 38,216.[1]

Waipahu is located along the northern shore of both Middle Loch and West Loch of Pearl Harbor. Both Interstate H-1 and Farrington Highway (Hawaii Route 90) run east-west through the length of Waipahu. The neighboring areas of Waipio, Village Park, Royal Kuniaand Waikele use Waipahu as their postal city, and are often considered to be part of Waipahu.

Waikele is located across the H1 freeway north of Waipahu. Waikele consists of newer subdivisions and an upscale outlet shopping center and world famous golf course. To the west via either roadway can be reached Makakilo and Kapolei, with the Leeward coast beyond. To the east lie Pearl City and the H-2 interchange to Waipiʻo. At the western end of Waipahu is Kunia Road (State Rte. 750) which leads to the Waipahu newer growth areas of Royal Kunia and Village Park north of H-1, and eventually on up across the central plain to Kunia and Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Army Airfield, and Wahiawā. Kunia Road becomes Fort Weaver Road (State Rte. 76) south of Farrington Highway, and goes south through Honouliuli and ʻEwa Villages to ʻEwa Beach.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.8 square miles (7.2 km2), all of it land.[11]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waipahu,_Hawaii)

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EWA BEACH

EWA BEACH

ʻEwa Beach (/ɛvə/)[1] or simply ʻEwa is a census-designated place (CDP) located in ʻEwa District and the City & County of Honolulu along the leeward coast of Oʻahu in Hawaiʻi. As of the 2010 Census, the CDP had a total population of 14,955.

The word ʻewa means “crooked” or “ill-fitting” in Hawaiian.[2] The name comes from the myth that the gods Kāne and Kanaloathrew a stone to determine the boundaries, but it was lost and later found at Pili o Kahe.[3]

Along much of the South Shore of Oʻahu, ʻEwa is a reference to the direction of ʻEwa Beach, roughly westwards along the shore. Related terms are mauka (towards the mountains, roughly northwards), makai (towards the ocean, roughly South), and Diamond Head or Koko Head, roughly eastwards along the shore.

ʻEwa Beach is located at 21°18’56” North, 158°0’26” West.[4] The main thoroughfare is Fort Weaver Road (State Rte. 76) which runs north (away from the coast) past ʻEwa to Waipahu, connecting there to Farrington Highway (State Rte. 90) and the H-1 freeway.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.9 square miles (4.9 km2), of which 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) is water. The total area is 24.06% water, consisting entirely of the Pacific Ocean off the island shore.

The ʻEwa Beach CDP does not include Ocean Pointe, ʻEwa Gentry, Iroquois Point, or ʻEwa Villages, though these are included within the postal service’s ZIP code for the area.[5][6]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CA%BBEwa_Beach,_Hawaii)

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MILILANI

MILILANI

Mililani is a city located near the center of the island of Oʻahu in Honolulu County, Hawaii, United States. It consists of twocensus-designated places, Mililani Town, with a population of 27,629 at the 2010 census,[3] and Mililani Mauka, with a 2010 census population of 21,039.

Mililani Town is located at 21°26′46″N 158°00′51″W,[5] near the center of Oʻahu Island, on the plateau or “central valley” between the two volcanic mountains that comprise the island. It is in the Central District and the City & County of Honolulu. The town is somewhat physically confined between the two large central Oʻahu gulches of Waikele and Kīpapa.

Travelling north on either Kamehameha Highway (State Rte. 99) or Interstate H-2 connects the traveller with Wahiawā. Travelling south on either of these arteries connects toWaipiʻo.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the Mililani Town CDP has a total area of 4.0 square miles (10.4 km2), of which 7,386 square metres (79,500 sq ft), or 0.07%, is water.[6]

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mililani,_Hawaii)

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SUNSET BEACH

SUNSET BEACH

Sunset Beach is on the North Shore of Oahu in Hawaii and known for big wave surfing during the winter season. The original Hawaiian name for this place is Paumalū. It was home to the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational surfing competition until 1985. The Quiksilver Big Wave Invitational in honor of Eddie Aikau started at Sunset Beach in 1984. Today Sunset Beach is home to the prestigious Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, which is part of the World Cup of Surfing. It also holds contests such as the Pipe Masters and a stop on the WSL Championship Tour.

Like many beaches on Oahu’s North Shore, Sunset Beach is considered dangerous for inexperienced surfers, due to extensive coral formations near the surface that present the risk of serious injury. Conditions for swimming change depending on the particular location and season. Generally speaking, the water is flat as a lake in the summers and has waves in the winters. All the surfing contests take place in the winter around December and January, that being the time of the largest and best waves for surfing. Swimming conditions change from spot to spot along the beach. There is usually a place to swim somewhere, except during stormy weather.

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunset_Beach_(Oahu))